Cover photo: © Marcel Holyoak, 2011, Flickr Photo Album, some rights reserved.

Yellow-billed magpies are the inspiration for Bay Area Naturalist’s logo as bright, personable birds that are only found along California’s coasts and Central Valley. While their restricted range makes them very special to see, it also makes them susceptible to the threats that climate change poses to our planet’s life. They inhabit open oak woodlands – a specialized habitat that could mean that this species will not be able to adapt well to changes brought about by our changing climate.

For more information on why we chose the yellow-billed magpie as our logo, check out our Site Logo page.

Yellow-billed magpies are found in California’s Central Valley and along the coast.

This species is endemic to California, meaning that they are only found in our state. Its range is quite restricted, covering an area just 500 miles long and 150 miles wide. They are found in open oak woodland habitats, usually near bodies of water.

Although they’re not found in the heart of the Bay Area, they can be seen in parts of the East and South Bay. Coyote Valley Open Space Preserve and Joseph D. Grant County Park are excellent places to see yellow-billed magpies in the Bay Area.

Yellow-billed magpies have a diverse diet.

They eat insects, fruits, seeds, and will scavenge for food. They have also been known to be kleptoparasitic, or steal food from other animals.

Yellow-billed magpies construct large, dome-shaped nests.

Often found on oak limbs, their nests are lined with mud on the inside. They nest in colonies of 3 to 30 pairs that maintain loose association with one another. They lay 5-8 eggs on average.

The female incubates the eggs, sustained by food brought from the male. After 18 days of incubation, the young hatch. Both of the parents will participate in feeding and caring for the offspring.

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Yellow-billed magpie nest; Source: DavisWiki

Yellow-billed magpies were hit hard by West Nile Virus.

In 2004 when West Nile Virus established itself in California, yellow-billed magpie populations suffered. It is estimated that the virus killed half of their population in just two years. Habitat loss and pesticide-use also threaten this species.

Cool facts about yellow-billed magpies:

  • The oldest yellow-billed magpie ever found was just shy of 10 years old.

Resources to learn more:

Posted by Taylor Crisologo

Taylor studied biology at Cornell University, where she worked with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology on projects ranging from breeding herring gulls off the coast of Maine to dancing lyrebirds in Australia’s Blue Mountains. When she’s not researching great places to experience Bay Area nature, you can find her birding or reading a book at home with her fiancé Dan and their two cats (Max and Penelope).

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